Smaller fish, bleached corals: Maldives hit by several threats from climate change

Smaller fish, bleached corals: Maldives hit by several threats from climate change

Coaching FOR Fishing

Due to climate change, the Indian Ocean’s lake surface temperatures have increased by 50 % faster than the average over the past 50 years. This causes fish to change their normal migration patterns, forcing them to migrate in cooler, deeper waters.

Sailors have also been forced to deal with more erratic wind patterns while sailing.

” The fishermen spend a lot of time at sea right now.” They spend about a week minimum out at sea”, said Maldives Fishermen’s Association director- public Abdulla Shakir Mohamed.

” So, if the sea is rough, if the weather is bad, then that will definitely ( pose ) problems ( for ) them returning back to the base or to their home island”.

The relationship works with thousands of fishermen, and teaches them necessary skills to overcome these difficulties.

These abilities, according to Mr. Abdulla, include the ability to gather and analyze data, as well as the ability to recognize various cloud types and weather patterns shifts.

He added that the training that was provided focused on how climate changes and how this affects smaller island communities.

In response to climate change, fishermen have learned to embrace green hunting techniques while relying on tech to chart a fresh program. However, these guardians of the ocean still take risks every day at sea.

” In the olden days, like maybe 10 years ago, during the season changes, everybody would go out to the reef ends where they ( could get a ) good number of animals”, Mr Ashfam lamented.

” Now, it’s been affected”.